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Informational and Fun Facts


0-6 Months Dental Care

Did you know that you should be cleaning your baby’s gums even before they have teeth?
We recommend that you clean your child's gums daily. You can do this with a damp washcloth, finger cot or gauze square. Gently wipe the baby’s gums and tongue preferably after each feeding. If you are looking for a product to use for wiping the gums and teeth of an infant, we recommend Spiffies.

Have you ever heard of “Early Childhood Cavities?”
Early Childhood Cavities is a unique pattern of tooth decay that begins with the upper front teeth and is followed by the primary molars, in the order of which they erupt.

At 6 months old we recommend scheduling your child’s first dental checkup.

It is also recommended that caregivers start brushing children’s teeth as soon as they start coming in and to brush them twice a day. When brushing a child’s teeth, you should use a child size tooth brush and a tiny amount of fluoride-free toothpaste, about the size of a dry piece of rice. This is recommended till they are 3 years of age.

It is also recommend that at 6 months you talk to your child’s doctor or dentist to see if a fluoride supplement would be right for your child.


6-18 Months Dental Care

Do you know how important baby teeth are?
Baby teeth usually start erupting around 6 months with the last tooth coming in around 24 months. Not only do these teeth help your child eat the foods that are important to their health and growth but they also help to hold a space in their mouth for their permanent teeth. When a child loses a tooth too early, it can lead to the permanent tooth coming in crooked. Baby teeth are also important when it comes to a child’s speech.

Have you heard of Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?
Baby bottle tooth decay is caused by liquids with natural sugar or those that have been sweetened cling to the teeth of an infant for a long time. The bacteria that is in the mouth feeds on sugars and creates an acid that eats away at the teeth.

To help prevent baby bottle tooth decay it is recommended not to put your baby to bed with a bottle. It is much easier never to start the habit than to stop it later.

Around 6-12 months, children start to reach for stuff, and this is a perfect time to introduce a cup. At 12-14 months it is recommended that children be weaned from the bottle.

We recommend that caregivers start brushing children’s teeth as soon as they start coming in and to brush them twice a day. When brushing a child’s teeth, you should use a child size tooth brush and a tiny amount of fluoride-free toothpaste, about the size of a dry piece of rice. This is recommended until they are 3 years of age.


19-24 Months Dental Care

At this age, children should have been weaned off the bottle and if they have not, they are at a high risk of developing cavities. If your child is still using a bottle, you should be checking your child’s teeth for signs of cavities regularly. You can do this by lifting the baby’s lip and looking for any white or brown spots on the teeth. If you see any of these spots, you should get them to the dentist as soon as possible.

To Snack or not to Snack? That is the question.
Children typically snack frequently at this age, and if they are doing a lot of sweet and starchy snacks, it can put them at a higher risk for cavities. When they eat sweet and/or starchy foods or drink sugary drinks, their teeth are being attacked by the acids. The more time a child spends snacking, the higher at risk they are for getting cavities. It is recommended that children’s snack times be limited.

We recommend that caregivers start brushing children’s teeth as soon as they start coming in and to brush them twice a day. When brushing a child’s teeth, you should use a child size tooth brush and a tiny amount of fluoride-free toothpaste, about the size of a dry piece of rice. This is recommended until they are 3 years of age.

3-7 Year Olds Dental Care

At this age, children typically want to start brushing their teeth on their own. It is ok to let them, but it is recommended that caregivers help to make sure they get all the hard to reach spots. Approximately 40%-50% of children will have a cavity before their first day of kindergarten. When brushing a child’s teeth at this age you should use a child size tooth brush and a small amount of fluoride toothpaste, about the size of a pea. They also should be flossing their teeth at least once a day.

Do you know what a sealant is?
A sealant is a plastic substance that is painted onto the chewing surface or also known as the grooves of the premolars and molars. Sealants help to shield against plaque, acid, foods, and drinks. Therefore sealants help protect from decay in the area where four out of five cavities are found in children.

8-12 Year Olds Dental Care

Around this age, you may start wondering when your child should go from a children’s toothbrush to an adult toothbrush? Your child can start to use an adult toothbrush as soon as it fits comfortably in their hand and mouth but there is no rush for this. Most children are brushing their teeth on their own at this age, but we still recommend that parents help to remind their child/children that they need to be brushing their teeth at least twice a day and flossing at least once a day.

Do you know what a gingivitis is and that children can get it?
Chronic Gingivitis is not uncommon in children. Signs of chronic gingivitis is swollen or puffy gums that are red in color, and bleed easily. Chronic Gingivitis can be treated and prevented by brushing, flossing, and seeing a dentist regularly. While Chronic Gingivitis is treatable, if it is not taken care of it can lead to more serious forms of gum disease like Aggressive Periodontitis and Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis.

13-18 Year Olds Dental Care

At this age, the thing to remember is that cavities are not just for kids. That sugary foods and drinks including sports drinks and energy drinks put your teen at risk for cavities and gum disease. Remind your teen that they need to be brushing their teeth at least twice a day and flossing at least once a day.
Here are some tips the ADA recommends for teens
  • Brush teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste for two minutes
  • Floss between your teeth daily
  • Avoid sugary and starchy snacks
  • Wear a mouth guard when they are active
  • Avoid smoking
  • Stay away from piercing any part of their mouth
  • Regularly see their dentist

Current Contest

Current Contest
The Oral-B "GUNK KEEP OUT" set is the prize for this month’s contest! The set includes a Drawstring bag, Electric Toothbrush, 45 Floss Picks, Mouthwash, and Toothpaste! To put your child's name in the contest visit us on Facebook. We will pick a winner on Friday, August 28th.

If you have any questions, please feel free to send us a message, and we will get back to you ASAP.
Good Luck!

Oral-B Contest Winner

Oral-B Contest Winner

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